Peggy Gou is reinventing house music with ‘Moment’ EP

Mitchell Famulare, Arts Editor

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Peggy Gou, a Berlin-based Korean artist, is gaining an immense amount of attention for her hypnotic house tracks that are continuing to hit more and more underground music scenes around the world.

If you follow any Instagrams who are part of these scenes, you are bound to hear Gou’s beats in the background, whether it be exclusive fashion events or gallery openings.

With nearly 1,000,000 monthly listeners on Spotify, heavily concentrated in European cities such as London, Paris and Amsterdam, where electronic dance music flourishes, Gou is making house music fun again: on the new release of her two-track EP “Moment,” Gou incorporates her voice with spinning synths.

While there is a certain nostalgia to these songs with the sharp snare drums and artificial handclaps, “Starry Night” and “Han Pan” prove to be posh and clean compared to other house artists of our times.

Typical of the genre, each track starts off with simple additions of beats. What makes Gou’s music an enjoyable journey is the inclusion of voice speaking in both Korean and English. Steering clear of K-pop, Gou presents her music for a certain setting.

The cover of “Moment” pictures a digital drawing of herself holding a mask in front of her face, an exploration of the idea of performance and how dancing can empower us all and shape who we want to be, even if it is just for a moment.

The mask Gou holds is not a simple mask, however. It is rather a traditional Korean Hahoetal mask, which can be dated back to the 12 century, worn during the Hahoe Pyolshin-gut t’al nori ceremony. These masks were worn by archetypal characters who performed in the ritual dances of the ceremony.

With these masks worn during momentary dances, Gou explores this theme of losing oneself in a dance throughout her 12-minute EP.

In “Starry Night,” she proclaims, “We are more like a song than this song right now,” later following with “We are more like a moment than this moment right now.” These ambiguous lines complement the increasing intensity of the artificial piano measures. She never wants this moment to end, the song feeling as if it could go on forever.

The beat breaks come as Gou states the word “us,” alluding to that never-wanting-this-night-to-end feeling.

Gou’s music is fresh and clean, building off of her 90s predecessors of house music. Performing in special museum events and recently partnering with Ray-Ban, Peggy Gou is finding her place quickly and successfully.

With “Moment” released off her new label Gudu, Gou is someone we all should keep our eye on.

Maybe she can be the one to bring a new wave of house music across the pond to the States.