The Concordiensis

Exercise can alter the architecture of the human heart

Timothy Fagan, Contributing Writer

October 3, 2019

Humans were built for endurance, and new research has revealed that human hearts can physically change, allowing our bodies to have greater stamina. An article in Science Magazine, written by Eva Frederick, talks about how the...

WHO: Global Influenza pandemics pose serious risk to health

Kartik Nath, Staff Writer

October 3, 2019

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines a pandemic as the “worldwide spread of a new disease.” The influenza virus, one of the most prevalent and rapidly-evolving viruses, has the potential to cause a worldwide pandemic at a...

WHO Report: Cancer, diabetes are top causes of death

Kari Kimball, Staff Writer

September 26, 2019

Noncommunicable diseases are responsible for over 70 percent of all deaths worldwide which amounts to 41 million people. These diseases include: diabetes, cancer and heart disease. Risk factors for this type of diseases inclu...

WHO Report: Air pollution poses worldwide health risks

Kartik Nath, Staff Writer

September 19, 2019

Ambient, or outdoor, air pollution is the greatest threat to human health across the world. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2018 nine in 10 people are exposed to air with dangerous levels of pollutants. O...

Cyclospora outbreak at Union College Commencement 2019

Charlotte Mineo, Sci/Tech Editor

September 12, 2019

Watery diarrhea, cramping, nausea and prolonged fatigue are several symptoms of a cyclospora infection according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) Cyclosporiasis Provider Fact Sheet. Several members of the campus commun...

Collapsed stars possibly form the universe’s platinum

Kari Kimball, Staff Writer

May 23, 2019

A certain type of dying starcalled collapsars are spinning stellar stars that are collapsing into black holes as their outer layers explode in a rare type of supernova. New research by Anna Frebel and Alexander Ji suggests that ...

Ultraprocessed foods blamed for obesity and heart disease

Charlotte Mineo, Sci/Tech Editor

May 23, 2019

When stepping into the grocery store a consumer might be greeted by a wall of fresh fruits and vegetables, they might even wander through the dairy aisle, but eventually, inevitably, they will be inundated by the bright wrappe...

Art from artificial intelligence activates specific neurons

Kari Kimball, Contributing Writer

May 16, 2019

Brains of primates recently were affected by artwork created by artificial intelligence. Nerve cells in macaques, a species of monkey, fired more frequently when they were exposed topicture generated by artificial Intelligence ...

29 Steinmetz Symposium celebrates students and science

Charlotte Mineo, Sci/Tech Editor

May 16, 2019

The 29 Annual Steinmetz Symposium marked an important scientific milestone for many students and advisors, and their families. Some students gave their first scientific talk, or stood proudly beside a research poster for the first...

Green sea turtles rebound due to Endangered Species Act

Kari Kimball, Contributing Writer

May 9, 2019

Green sea turtles, or Chelonia mydas, have been on the endangered species list since 1978. There are now signs that the species is recovering. Recently, there have been more sightings of green sea turtles around Hawaii by an...

Journalist tells of the power of politeness for science writers

Charlotte Mineo, Sci/Tech Editor

May 9, 2019

Last Wednesday, May 1, Union students were able to participate in a science writing workshop with science writer Kat Eschner. The workshop, held in the Phi Beta Kappa room, was well attended. Students and faculty filled the sp...

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